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Humous and Chicory Salad

FAQ's

  • What is nutritional therapy?
    Nutritional therapy is a complementary medicine that uses nutrition and lifestyle changes to promote an individual's health and well-being. Nutritional therapists assess and identify potential nutritional imbalances using a variety of tools and develop personalised nutrition and lifestyle programmes to address them. They collaborate with conventional medicine and other healthcare professionals to provide comprehensive care.
  • Why is it important to see a registered Nutritional Therapist?
    The title "nutritional therapist" is not protected by law in the UK, so anyone can call themselves a nutritional therapist, regardless of their qualifications. However, only nutritional therapists who have completed accredited training can register with the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) or the British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT). These professional bodies set high standards of practice for their members, so you can be confident that registered nutritional therapists have the necessary training and competence. Registered practitioners consider each individual to be unique and recommend personalised nutrition and lifestyle programmes.
  • What is the difference between dietitians, nutritionists and nutritional therapists?
    Dietitians are qualified to assess, diagnose and treat dietary and nutritional problems for individuals and communities. They typically work in the NHS, but may also work in other settings such as education, research, media and sport. The title ‘dietician’ is protected by law in the UK and statutorily regulated by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Nutritionists are food and nutrition experts who help communities improve their health and well-being by providing evidence-based information. Unlike nutritional therapists, they are not qualified to work with clients on a one-on-one basis in a clinical setting. The title "nutritionist" is not regulated by law in the UK, but nutritionists who meet certain standards can join professional bodies such as the Association for Nutrition (AfN) and apply to the UK Voluntary Register of Nutritionists (UKVRN) to become Registered Nutritionists (RNutrs). Nutritional therapists (NTs) are food and nutrition experts who can work with both groups and individuals in a clinical setting. Unlike dietitians, they do not diagnose or treat diseases. Instead, they use a functional medicine approach to assess the root causes of an individual’s symptoms, health concerns or diseases. NTs never recommend nutritional therapy as a replacement for medical advice, but often work alongside conventional medicine practitioners to support people with a wide range of health conditions. The title "nutritional therapist" is not regulated by law in the UK, but practitioners who have completed accredited training can register with the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) or the British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT).
  • What is functional medicine?
    Functional medicine is a comprehensive, holistic and patient-centred approach to healthcare that focuses on promoting overall health and well-being, rather than simply treating diseases. Practitioners of functional medicine evaluate clinical imbalances within biological systems to identify the root causes of disease and dysfunction. They then work with their patients to develop personalised action plans which address underlying issues and promote healing. Nutrition and lifestyle changes are emphasised in functional medicine. Functional medicine practitioners work alongside conventional medicine.

Frequently asked

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